Elisa Rueda, Founder & CEO, The Co-Work Experience

Elisa creates curated online enrichment programs that take your employee's interest in mind. Whether you're bringing your remote teams together to focus on personal growth or dedicate to their wellness. Elisa believes when you invest in your employees, they become more invested in you.


Troy: And good afternoon, everyone. hope everyone's having a nice day, even though it's kind of cloudy and not that exciting outside, but I'm sure everyone's got plenty of stuff going on and getting ready for the holidays coming up. And somehow in less than two weeks, I'm nowhere where this year has flown by, but I am, able to, to be joined today by Alisa. She is the founder and CEO of the co-work experience. I appreciate you taking the time to, to talk to me today.
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Elisa: Nice to meet you. Thanks for having me

Troy: For sure. So, why don't you kind of start off, start us off with a little bit, kind of like your origin story. What kind of got you into wanting to start your own business just kind of some background that way. Yeah,
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Elisa: Absolutely. So, so pretty much I was in corporate, I'd say for about 15, over 15 years. And in, during that time I had, I had thoughts. Let's just say I had thoughts. I'd been wanting to explore things. Like I came from an entrepreneurial family, you know, they were Mexican American immigrants, but then they came and, and they built a business. They built a restaurant line, they got into commercial property. So I was very heavily inspired by them. But I grew up in this, this type of mold where it's like the ideal was to go to college, get a full-time job in corporate and just, just drive on into the sunset. Right. However, as I was nearing a certain age, I felt like there was a lot of things in my life that I still had an accomplished, you know, one of that being, you know, married with kids.
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Elisa: And I feel like it's very important in terms of like my story in my life. and it just so happens right around that time. I had, a pretty invasive eye surgery, where I had a retinal detachment. And the reason why I bring this up is because this was the catalyst that made me realize, like I need to do something different. And so, when I went through this really emotional, traumatic experience, I decided to travel and work in travel at the same time. But it, that soon I soon ended up quitting because I was like, what would I do different in life If I didn't end up getting what I had hoped or I was expecting to get this entire time. And I was like, well, I would, I would create my own business. Right. I would, I would do something that I would truly enjoy.
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Elisa: And that's when I started exploring. And, and I, and I started traveling and, I was far away enough from the us to, to be able to explore, the sense of producing events again, which when I was back in corporate in the U S like for me, producing events at the time were just doing anything related to events was more of a personal thing. And, and then sometimes I would do it for clients, but it just wasn't seen as something that was seen as a full-time line of work. Right. When I started doing, events in Southeast Asia for digital nomads, that's when I realized, wait a minute, I can, I can make this into a business. I can do something more with this. And that's when this whole idea of becoming my own entrepreneur, my own business, really came to fruition. and that's when I realized that, yeah, I can, I can do, I can do this for myself and I don't have to follow any other, any, any other people's rules or templates that I'm supposed to, that everyone else is supposed to do. So
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Troy: Very nice. It's not uncommon to kind of hear that story of like immigrant parents, you're working hard. And then again, education is definitely the way for most people to kind of get to a better place in life. However, I think in the last 20, 30 years, we're understanding that it's not maybe the traditional education way of, Hey, go get educated, go find a job that you can work out for the next 50 years of your life, retire with a pension and those kinds of things like that. Part of it isn't isn't there anymore. And so, and so being able to, kind of take that, that detour in for, for you, which it's not, again, also that uncommon for a lot of people where it's kind of a very stark event. Hopefully for most people, it's not, you know, traumatic, you know, physical ailment kind of situation, but I need to make a change.
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Troy: Like, I don't know how I want to this, isn't what I want to be doing for the next 10, 15, 40 years or whatever that may be. And I also don't want to live with the regret of why didn't I try this hopefully is a big motivating factor for a lot of people. I mean, it's, sometimes it's not enough to get people off the fence, but it's one of those things that looking back, it's nice to not have that even if the business hadn't been successful to not have that regret of, oh, I should have tried it.

Elisa: Right. And you know, what's really interesting is that when you, when I am myself and I'm sure many other people, when you come from immigrant parents, they've used success as in getting that college education, getting that corporate job, because that's not what it's like in their countries. So I really had a battle, a couple of cultural barriers in that sense, right. And then the generation that I'm in, it's still resonates, like having that full-time job up until like you retire, that's what you do. And it just so happens that I'm in this, I think it's essential generation where I was part part of this, the older generation, but also part of the newer generation of computers and, and, and the interwebs and the social media is where I was able to see a lot of self-made business owners doing things on their own, based on the information that they were able to access. So,
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Troy: No, I mean, similar, I am old enough to where the majority of my schooling was pre-internet. And so like, you didn't necessarily have there's so many, opportunities to create your own small business that when I first was going to school, wouldn't have been an option at all, because they kind of were created as the internet, came into our maturity. I mean, even obviously even the early, early stages of the internet, it was just basically a faster, quicker way to go get an encyclopedic instead of sort of an actual way to have a job, have a job in a career. It's also interesting. You mentioned kind of, again, that coming from your parents, like, you know, I think for a lot of people, whether you're immigrant or not like that mindset of like, Ooh, the goal or the ideal is to be somehow be different and build upon what someone already already has.
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Troy: Right. So again, for a lot of immigrants, especially, and for a lot of people, right. If you didn't go to college, getting that college degree is kind of seen as the, the, the gold standard kind of thing. Right. For a lot of us nowadays for a lot of millennials, because they get married a lot later in life being married is kind of that gold standard for different things. And so it's, and it's, but everyone really kind of has to choose their own path and realize that there isn't by any means one right way to do things. And especially now, again, even, even 20 years ago, when there was more, there were fewer ways, there still wasn't necessarily one right way. But now that there's thousands of different ways that you could kind of traverse your journey. There's definitely not a right way that it has.
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Elisa: It's funny that, we, we are talking about this because one of my friends, we were with his family. Right. And he was asking me he's like, because I think there were, there were the younger kids, his kids were really questioning about having a college degree and they had been following my story right online. And so they were like, yes, we want to, we kind of want to be like Elisa in some ways. And he just kind of gives me this look like, but you still need a college degree. Right. And so to be as honest as it could be also conscious of who the audience was, I was like, well, I know for my generation, that was certainly still a requirement in order to feel like you gained some kind of success. and I still feel like the generation, even after me, it's a transitional gen, generation. we're not everyone has to go to a formal college. I don't think they can still do things online, but it's still, there's still a weight to it. Right.
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Troy: Well that in, it's hard, again, it's hard for people to change their minds on stuff. Right. So for people, even our age who grew up where college was kind of the best way to go, it's hard to think of like college not being the best way to go. But again, depending on what someone wants to do with their life, it may not be, and with the rising cost of college too, like that's a whole other scenario that wasn't quite as crazy when at least when I went to college, it was not that it was cheap, but it definitely wasn't as ridiculous as it can be today. In that regard, when you, you mentioned, kind of come your family coming from Mexico, did you guys, have you guys lived in, lived in Austin and most of your life, or was Austin kind of a

Elisa: Actually, no, it was, it was a later career for me. So actually my folks, they came from Mexico. Right. My mom, they, they, they had a little stint in Austin for a little while and they came to Houston and then I ended up bouncing back over to Austin. pretty much at the beginning of my like college career, that's where I was like, I'm, I'm a UT Longhorn fan. And so I was like, where do I go And like, yeah, Austin just felt the right place to come back to. And so that's where I ended up for most of my professional career.
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Troy: So when you first started traveling, was that traveling, doing a corporate job at that point in time Or was that, or, you know, living abroad or was that immediately going into your starting your company with the corporate events
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Elisa: So my, my, there was two types of traveling that was happening for me. So when I was in corporate, I was a consultant. Right. So, so I did have to travel domestically within the U S to visit clients. but then that took a toll on me and I quickly realized that that was not ideal. Right. it was, but so then I started working from home, for short period of time. And that's when the whole thing happened and that therefore, I was like, well, let me see if I can travel and work from home in a different country, which worked, but that soon shed a major contrast of what I was really looking for. even when I was able to work from home for, you know, a corporate job in Italy, I say, for instance, so,
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Troy: And like I say, at the time you thought you began, you at least took the chances of, oh, maybe this is how I want to do it, but you're able to, but had you not taken that leap, you wouldn't have realized, no, this isn't what I want to do. So even though it wasn't, you know, what you maybe deem a success is like, oh, this, you know, really was what you wanted to do it, at least check that off the box. and kind of got you again, helps that momentum to get you to where you kind of go in from that standpoint. It's interesting. You mentioned about the travel kind of stuff. So as a realtor, I get to work with clients. A lot of whom in the tech space here do travel quite a bit. And it's so funny to me that the people that travel the most for work are generally the people that don't want to leave their home when they're not having to travel for work, they have all these airlines, hotel, hotel points, and then on a weekend for free. And they're like, just leave me at home on my couch and my bed. I don't want to get near an airport.
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Elisa: It's funny that you say that because after my consulting career, when I would hear people saying that they had 200,000 miles, 300,000 miles, I actually would feel sad for them because I knew what the, what the sacrifice was to get that exact same thing happen to me. I had so many miles and all the last thing I want to do is travel any more. So I understand a hundred.
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Troy: So you you've been traveling a little bit now you've been living outside the country, traveling a little bit for your corporate job. What made you kind of focus on the company that you started co-working experience
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Elisa: So, so it actually, it's funny, I'm sure this is a lot, this is common for most people, but it was just, it was just a little series of events that ended up accumulating into this big, like decision and big outcomes, right. That it feels like it was calculated, but it does. I feel calculated in hindsight, but it doesn't feel like it in during the time. But, I was in Bali, right. And as far as I was saying, I was far away from the U S to like, to like start to explore things I really wanted and not feel prejudged by it. And so, Lombok, a little tiny island, in Indonesia suffered a really mass grave earthquake. And, you know, one of the things that we thought about doing was creating a fundraiser. I was like, let's do a fundraiser event and let's try to raise as much money as we can.
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Elisa: And it was in that event. I was in charge of bringing a bunch of partners together and really kind of putting the whole organization of it. And I realized, oh, wow, my capacity, my ability to be able to do something like that. And so when we walked away from this event and we got, you know, we had a great turnout. We had about 17,000 in one night. It was, it was a great, great, like, we were very happy with the success and, and how we were able to help the families. But I walked away realizing like, well, wait, what else could I do Right. What else could I do And I was very much into the cohort culture because that's how, that's what got me into traveling. I was in, I was in, I was joining these travel cohort groups where you travel with them for three, once they set up a co-work space, they set up an apartment.
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Elisa: So you're able to remote work easily. Right. And so that's what kind of tuned me into that. And, and you're, you're amongst a lot of digital nomads at the time. So I thought, well, let me see if I can create a different kind of event, not, not necessarily just a traditional party, but let me get some beautiful Villa, some venue where people can come together to co-work, but just for one day, like a pop-up. And I couldn't bring a bunch of different elements and add an itinerary. So there it's very dynamic and they could have tastings, they could have a massage, they can, co-work in this beautiful Villa that we can, all, we all aspire and all inspired to be in right one day. And it became such a huge success. That, that was the turning point. When I realized that this is something that I could actually offer to, to teams, back in the U S
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Troy: Yeah. Like, so again, it's, it's interesting to hear, again, some of those little things, and then having, you know, like, oh, this is a cool idea. What would, I guess, what were you initially thinking for that first event Like, what was the goal that you had kind of hoped for that you kind of crushed
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Elisa: Well, I would say that the goal, so at the time I was like, well, I need to make this worthwhile for the sponsor. Right. And, and so I thought, well, what could I do other than like, if I can turn these, these attendees into little marketing users, I'd have them tag tag the main sponsor, which was the venue at the time to promote the event. And I knew that because the venue was just amazing and beautiful. What's the first thing that everyone does. They want to take out their phone and start taking pictures. And so I thought, all right, if you're going to take a picture and you're going to post it tag the sponsor, tag the sponsor and tag me 10,000 days later within, within a four or five-hour span. I mean, the venue got an amazing amount of inquiries and input on wanting to hear more about like what they did.
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Elisa: And so, and it was through that same, same attention. I started getting online attention from other people. and that was the biggest goal at the time I was trying to hit. But on top of that, it just so happened that I also did a survey with everyone that was there. I said, Hey, what do you think about this concept Do you like it Would you do it again Would you recommend it to people And 9 out of 10, 9.5 out of 10 people were, I should say, really forty-five people, where was said, absolutely. This was the most unique, amazing experience ever. It felt exclusive. We've never done this ever before. Can this, can we do this again And so
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Troy: When is your next one at that point Yeah,
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Elisa: Exactly. What is my next one And, and that's when I realized I was onto something really
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Troy: Great. When was that first event
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Elisa: So that was, oh my gosh, that was October of 2018. I believe it's 2018. And so I think what elevated my situation to the next level is that cohort pop-up, which is what I call the event. I had it recorded. And I was able to, I had a videographer produced the video of it to have it documented. Right. And even that video in itself ended up being the, the, the product or the item or the object that got Silicon valley to call me to find out, Hey, can you do that for us, for our team off sites And so that's what, what just kind of blew things over for me, but it was in 2018 and things were more picking up.
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Troy: So I was going to say, I'm sure 2019 was a great, it was a great year as far as really kind of getting, getting things, getting a bunch of outs, going, getting those connections with Silicon valley and other, companies. And then obviously, you know, 2020 hits, how, you know, obviously it had a dramatic impact. Like what, you know, how, what kind of pivot, did you and your company make with that.
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Elisa: So the pandemic hit, and I saw the writing on the wall, on the wall right away, all my work, all the event and team offside request came to complete halt. And it was actually quite personally devastating to me, I think in an emotional sense, because I thought, wait a minute, this whole time, I finally figured out what is it I wanted finally have the confidence to really do this and really make something out of it. And now the pandemic has completely put a full stop to it. And I had it, I had to just sit with that a while. I had to sit with that though, that gave me the opportunity to explore online events. And so I started, producing online events for, for clients who needed, who were producing like Seiko Susi core series, or say an Yvette series. And so that gave me a different whole nother opportunity to pivot towards the,
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Troy: And so how well, how long did it take you to kind of make that pivot Because again, right. Like as a business owner, the, the great thing is you're, you know, you're your own boss kind of, you know, the decisions are in your hands. The downside is, is the decisions on hands there isn't someone you can look up to to say, Hey, what are we going to do in this situation So was it a pretty, I mean, just be out of obviously necessity a pretty quick pivot in that regard or,
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Elisa: Yeah, it was north. So because like, I was a starting entrepreneur, right. I, I had already gone a year and a half, two years traveling, having quit my job, you know, and I had already planned on, okay, this is it. I'm going to start picking up. And then the epidemics and pandemics, and no, no, no, you're going to, you're really going to slow this down for you. And so I think the pandemic hit really February of 2020, and I didn't actually start getting fully on, into online events until September, October of 2020. So I had, I had that additional little time to really kind of think through what I was going to do and how it was going to pivot. And it just so happens that now I'm still doing that. but online wellness, programs for, for teams as well. So now it's actually, it's only added to my suite of products, which is the online and the life, the live experiences.
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Troy: Sure. Have you had any of the live events since the packet, have you
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Elisa: Yeah, I think so too. Yeah. Clients came back and they came back with, with a ferocity. They were ready. Yeah. And it was, I think it was this year actually started calling me around beginning of the summer and they said, all right, let's start making plans, but let's plan cautiously in case things change. and so since then, it's just been an uptick. And now, we're doing online online wellness programs. we're doing webinars series for business, for teams that are looking to do business development, as well as marketing events, as well as team off sites, live team off sites as well. So that's about it.
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Troy: Have you had any events where it's kind of been a mix of the two or is it usually kind of been one or the other
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Elisa: Yeah, it's usually one or the other. so, and if I put into three buckets, cause technically, so my main two focuses is team off sites, right. With what's that's, what's in the, within the team, company. And then there's the online wellness program. That's also within the company it's to treat burnout and to treat like, you know, personal growth with H what have you, but then you've got these other events, which is the marketing events, which is, you know, the webinars and what have you, the panel events, those are for marketing and that's like outside of the team. So kind of going back to your question, I, oh my gosh. Can you repeat your question again
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Troy: If, if you see if you've been seeing like a mix of him or they've kind of been into, you know, either online
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Elisa: Yeah. It's one or the other. Yeah. The only time I've seen a mix is when we've done, like, at a team offsite or like at a panel event, we might, why are in a speaker to speak, you know And then we have a projector in.
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Troy: Yeah. Because that's one of the things that I've been seeing hearing from other business owners or executives, is that like, you know, because so many companies are either still allowing employees to work from home or there's kind of, again, you know, coming in a few days a week and stuff is that it seems like most, most executives, most managers are kind of either having their, just even their own team meetings and stuff kind of be one or the other. Cause it seems like it's challenging initially to try to do both, right. Like, you know, the people in person, you know, if you have half the team in person and half the team, not like it's just not the same experience for any
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Elisa: No, it's not ideal. So, and I typically work with remote tech companies. And so what they're doing, for instance, they're actually doing both, but not at, not at the same time, like they'll have an online wellness program to really kind of treat, treat the employees on a daily, on an ongoing maintenance basis. But then, then they'll have their yearly company-wide offsite and then they'll have their team-wide, teams team level. off-sites too. And that will be, that'll be, trickled along in the, in the year. So they, sometimes they do do both, but not, not, not the same.
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Troy: Sure. Are you seeing the event spaces So for like the offsite stuff you mentioned, you know, the first one, you know, the sponsor, which was the event space pop-up yeah. For, for the pop-up was, was kind of there or how are, are you seeing those events spaces kind of come back pretty hard I mean, obviously they were some of the hardest places hit, you know, that and service restaurant. Are you seeing them kind of rebounding or is that still been channeling
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Elisa: Yeah. There, there, there, you're talking about the venues, right. Then I need some thoughts. Yeah. They're they're going through the same thing I went, I'm going through where the demand is coming back with a no, I, the word verocity. Yeah. however, I'll tell you a little real estate, little insight here, something that even I'm like, I, I'm definitely keeping near to being the person on this side where I'm looking for venues constantly at the team size level and at the company wide level. Wow. There's a huge market for venues for that, because I'll cause right now, and I'll start with the team size, team size offsite. We have team size team sizes of 10, sometimes 15, sometimes 30. Right. And they're only looking for one day outlet, right. They're not even looking for an overnight stay. And so one of the things we're always looking for is these beautiful, like five maybe, three, three, 5,000 square feet homes, you know, something that's really large that has like maybe a pool of view or what have you that we can just run out just for, for like half a day, you know
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Elisa: And we bring in catering, we bring in these events and they're able just to relax and lounge just for the day, because the last thing they want to do is just go to another restaurant or even go to a vet wedding venue. They want something a little bit more intimate and private. And that's one of the things that I'm consistently seen in the market or not in the market. I should say. I don't see much of that. And I really struggled to when, when you go to like say VRBO or some of these peer spaces, it's very limited, but they don't, a lot of people aren't targeting
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Troy: Corporate catering to that type of yeah.
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Elisa: And then, and then for the team company wide sites, that's another thing too. A lot of them are not looking to go to another hotel. They want to invest. Like they want to go to a camp grounds. They want to go somewhere where it feels like there's this there's a, still a big, large meeting room so that they can work during the day and have their co-work pop-up. But, but by afternoon, by evening or by the weekend, they can still have that campsite, like adventures outside when they do. And there's not that many of them. And I'm gonna tell you right now, that's a huge, huge miss in the market at this point. Yeah.
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Troy: Now if you're Austin specifically, it's cha it gets challenging because, they've kind of cracked down on a lot of those short term rental kind of stuff. Right. So that kind of thing, and my guess is that there's other cities in the area or in the country that, you know, I know Chicago, is another city that has, and some, my guess is that there's others that have kind of followed suit, which have, may make it challenging. Again, it's, it's definitely something where we're seeing, again, just a lot of shifts in what someone wants in a home, right Like now having that dedicated office has become extra important again or having a second space, those kinds of things, having one of the reasons Austin is doing so well, home wise on top of being a great place for tech and stuff is that, you know, people from California or from the east coast are like, Hey, I need, I want to come here.
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Troy: So I can have a little bit of a yard because I don't want to be stuck in a studio apartment if the pandemic hits again. Or if, you know, we're having to stay at the stay at home and everything's closed. And so it'll be interesting to see how, how real estate continues to shift. I mean, work office space, even at work is having a shift from traditional cubicles to maybe a little bit more open space. You're not having to be so close to other people you work with. And again, it turned a lot of even corporate space into kind of co-work space where you're here Monday, Thursday, someone else's here Tuesday, Friday, and, and whatnot, to kind of change up how, how the work experience goes.
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Elisa: Yeah know, it's funny because like, we, you know, my partner and I, we still are travelers. We're still seasonal settlers. We're still traveling across into other countries like Mexico, Portugal. And, even when we come to the us and it's so funny, but like the biggest thing we always look for is, you know, Wi-Fi connection to proper, working desks, an area to work out. And some of these AirBnBs are just not configured for that. yeah. And so it's just like such a miss. And one of the things that we plan on doing is when we get, well, we're getting our real estate that we actually target, remote workers and digital nomads, whether it's in the U S and outside.
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Troy: No, for sure. It definitely, most of that short-term rental stuff has been based around the vacation, kind of stuff's right here, here in Austin. It's Hey, where, where what's the type of home or space that someone would want to come for F1 weekend or for south by Southwest. And so having office space is not critical to that level, having a gym they're not critical at all. You just want to maximize bedrooms, the chin and a little bit of the living space because it's just kind of a place it's, it's a
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Elisa: Yeah,
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Troy: Well, no, yeah. That's what I'm saying. It's completely, it's completely different in that regard because that's just not what the investors have been. You know, again, haven't been focused on, has it been, you know, again, the, the pandemic had such a profound effect on speeding up the timeframe of what probably would have happened anyway. I mean, it's something that would have happened eventually that as we got more and more remote workers, people would have had that opportunity and it would have been something in five years or so, but that what would have happened in five years without the pandemic happened in five months with the pandemic of being at, being at home and, changing kind of the work, experience for a lot of companies and employees,

Elisa: A lot of opportunity, to really kind of get ahead of these changes that people just pay a little bit more close attention.
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Troy: So obviously, you know, the real estate space is something that you guys are looking at. What's what are some of the things, you guys are planning for 20, 22 and beyond
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Elisa: We're going back to Mexico. more so because we have some business over there and we're associated with a few wellness retreats because by day, yes, I do serve corporate. and I work with corporate clients to help, you know, serve these, their full-time employees and wellness around that actually, too. But I, but we're also doing this for off hours for people that want to like seek their own wellness, like treatments after hours own in their own private time. Right. and it just so happens. and in five years I, we have a plan, right. Pretty much to come back and to get actually to create a big event, then you space more. So for the same clientele that I'm working with today, so.
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Troy: Okay. And do you see any kind of changes, you know, happening in that space in the next couple of years Kind of, I mean, obviously it's going to be more of what you're seeing now, but DC, is there anything else kind of on the horizon that you're seeing that you think will kind of change those types of events or even just the kind of work experience for a lot of, companies and yeah,
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Elisa: I do see a lot more co-work popups and re remote work, remote cohort camps happening the co-work and just to kind of give you a little, like, just a, just a refresh. So the co-work pop-up is how can we make the co-work day or the Workday a bit more dynamic. Right. And how do we make it more interesting And so we take teams off site, to a whole new other venue. They co-work there, you know, we put we've we've we've, we get them all together working in a room, but then we, we compliment it with a bunch of activities and classes and tasting. So it actually feels a bit more leisure, leisure, co-working. Right. And so I see a lot more teams doing that, as their team off sites and doing that more regularly, especially if they are removed versus
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Troy: Nice. And then most of the companies that you're working with are how are they larger co like teams within larger companies, or are you seeing it more with smaller kind of startups and companies that way
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Elisa: Actually, more middle to larger size Like the team off sites we work with are between, like, it could be 60 to like 200 team members. And it seems like right now, the only available space for that is for hotels. And the last thing people want to do is be stuck in a big old ballroom, you know, they want something with windows, they want something with a little bit more, more interaction. And, yeah, and, but then, then as I was mentioning earlier, then we have the team level, off-sites where they just want to go somewhere for like six hours and just to bond and, and have some kind of more of an intimate experience where they're not going to like some public bowling alley and, you know, and it's just some arcade place. They want to go somewhere where it's like a private, luxurious venue or a house I should say, just so that they could be inspired and enjoy. And, and then they're done by 5:00 PM. There's there's no, there's no cake stands. There's no overnight stays. And I'm just like, my God, I, I need a house like this now, so I can rent a team team off sites. Cause that would be such a, that's such a myth.
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Troy: Well, it sounds like it's kind of a ever changing event or ever-changing kind of environment and stuff that way. And so there's again, probably going to be a lot of changes, for that began going forward and more and more companies kind of looking at those types of things or employees, or co you know, individual workers or corporations that are kind of looking to, help and trying to organize something like that themselves. What's kind of the best way for them to get in touch with you directly.
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Elisa: I definitely my website, the cohort, the co-work experience.com. I'm available at my email, which is Elisa E L I S a at V co-work experience.com. And can I just mention a couple of tips, you know, because it seems like, you know, it's funny, but a lot of my clients like come to me, they're like, we need to plan something next month. Can you help us Yeah. If you're planning on doing any team off site, no matter the size, or obviously if it's smaller, it's going to be much easier. But if you're going to do a company-wide team off site, you want to plan this months and months in advance. it's, it's, you're going to do yourself and everyone, I think paper, if you do that, there'll be a lot less stress.
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Troy: Great thing is we live in a society where we can get things kind of instantly the downside is we expect everything to be kind of an instant kind of thing. And unfortunately it's not always the case. And so I've, I've definitely felt your pain there as far as like clients like, Hey, we need to have bought a house last weekend. Well, let's take time, take some time to find the house bill to get off here and get it accepted and all that kind of stuff. So just planning it can, yeah, definitely cannot, overstress it too much. Or you plan the better, the experience will be in a lot of things. Yeah, absolutely. Awesome. Well, I really appreciate you taking the time to, to chat today, at least, and or to all the changes, and events coming your way in 2022. Thank you so much. Appreciate it, everyone have a great day.​​​​​​​


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